The top 5 longest jetties in the world

The top 5 longest jetties in the world

We love long walks on the beach. Literally.

And no journey down to the shores is complete without a stroll along the jetty or pier. Offering spectacular, immersive views of surroundings and a little something different to enjoy with friends, there’s plenty to keep you entertained on these hotspots.

Luckily, (thanks to historical jetty maintenance preserving their structuring) there’s plenty of them around the globe, with some of the world’s longest jetties scattered across some of the most eclectic locations. So if you’re interested in beefing up your bucket list, here’s our countdown of the top five longest jetties in the world.

Southport Pier

Southport Pier is Britain’s second-longest pier, soaring 1,112 metres over the water. This dock has been loved by locals and visitors for over 150 years, boasting views across the north-west, spanning as far as Blackpool and the North Wales Coast on a clear day.

Up until 2015, you could even take a tram to the end of the wharf to enjoy the beautiful views at the pavilion with a cup of tea in hand. Southport also holds the title of Britain’s oldest iron pier, making it a unique attraction to visit while you’re in the country.

Busselton Jetty

Located in the southern area of Western Australia, Busselton Jetty is the second-longest wooden jetty in the world, measuring 1,841 metres in length. This spot is known for its extensive jetty maintenance, with construction beginning in 1853 and ending in the mid-1960s. This beautiful pier brings in thousands of visitors each year and attracted over 500,000 people in 2017 and 2018 alone. With loads of attractions – including an underwater observatory, a jetty train and even underwater dining options – it’s no wonder this spot has become a local favourite.

Southend Pier

The Southend Pier is famous for being the world’s longest ‘pleasure’ pier. Measuring 2,160 metres, this one stretches all the way from Southend-on-Sea to the Thames Estuary. This spot is cherished by locals and visitors alike and features a museum bursting with vintage train and tram carriages, memorabilia and period costumes. If you’re not up for the two-kilometre walk, you can even take the train to the end of the pier for a recreational fishing day.

Lucinda Jetty

The Lucinda Jetty has long smashed many records in the Southern Hemisphere, including the longest wooden structure and service jetty in this part of the world. Running 5,760 metres into the horizon, it’s no wonder this spot has become such a loved tourist spot in Queensland.

Although you cannot access the actual jetty (as it is privately owned), visitors still opt to spend their days sitting on the beach to observe it as they take in the fresh sea breeze. This jetty is used mainly for offloading bulk goods, especially raw sugar; you could say the Lucinda Jetty is pretty sweet.

Progreso Pier

Mexico’s Progreso Pier is the world’s longest, running 6,500 metres into the Gulf of Mexico. This pier’s length is used to allow cargo ships to dock in the area, as the Yucatan coast and limestone shelf are too shallow for large boats to dock in. The area has become incredibly popular for cruise ships, with tourists hitting up the area to experience the pier, as well as nearby archaeological sites and the beautiful beachside culture. Tourists access the city via the wharf, but not before they’ve walked through its markets and taken the shuttle bus to the coast.

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